Minimize What is Envisat?
Web Content Image

Envisat was ESA's successor to ERS. Envisat was launched in 2002 with 10 instruments aboard and at eight tons is the largest civilian Earth observation mission.

More advanced imaging radar, radar altimeter and temperature-measuring radiometer instruments extend ERS data sets. This was supplemented by new instruments including a medium-resolution spectrometer sensitive to both land features and ocean colour. Envisat also carried two atmospheric sensors monitoring trace gases.

The Envisat mission ended on 08 April 2012, following the unexpected loss of contact with the satellite. (See related news from 09 May 2012)

Minimize Latest Mission Operations News

Network issue at D-PAC facility

06 December 2016

Due to a network issue, access to the servers at the D-PAC facility (pfd-ns-dp.eo.esa.int, eoa-dp.eo.esa.int) is temporarily unavailable.

MERCI-MERIS RR maintenance - 07 December 2016

06 December 2016

Due to planned maintenance, the MERCI web interface hosting Envisat MERIS Reduced Resolution (RR) data will be unavailable for approximately 4 hours from 09:30 CET on Wednesday 07 December 2016.

On-The-Fly collection maintenance - 01 December 2016

29 November 2016

Due to scheduled maintenance, the new On-The-Fly (OTF) collection will be unavailable on Thursday 01 December 2016, from 09:00-13:00 CET.

Minimize Latest Mission Results News
Web Content Image

Sharing Earth observation satellite data to help understand our planet

01 December 2016

Since the launch of the first Earth-observing satellites in the 1970s, numerous missions from international space organisations have taken to the sky. Today, decades of data are helping scientists to build a better picture of changes to our planet.

Web Content Image

Methane and carbon dioxide on the rise

13 May 2016

Satellite readings show that atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide are continuing to increase despite global efforts to reduce emissions.

Web Content Image

Antarctic ice safety band at risk

08 February 2016

Antarctica is surrounded by huge ice shelves. New research, using ice velocity data from satellites such as ESA's heritage Envisat, has revealed that there is a critical point where these shelves act as a safety band, holding back the ice that flows towards the sea. If lost, it could be the point of no return.

Web Content Image

International effort reveals Greenland ice loss

13 November 2015

One of Greenland's glaciers is losing five billion tonnes of ice a year to the ocean, according to researchers. While these new findings may be disturbing, they are reinforced by a concerted effort to map changes in ice sheets with different sensors from space agencies around the world.

Web Content Image

Is Europe an underestimated sink for carbon dioxide?

05 January 2015

A new study using satellite data suggests that Europe's vegetation extracts more carbon from the atmosphere than previously thought.