Minimize What is Swarm?
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Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission approved in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and was successfully launched on 22 November 2013.

The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution as well as the electric field in the atmosphere using a constellation of 3 identical satellites carrying sophisticated magnetometers and electric field instruments.

Minimize Latest Mission Operations News

US job opening on Swarm/e-POP

19 September 2017

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa seeks to appoint a post-doctoral researcher to join a dynamic and expanding group of space physics researchers. Amongst other sources, the post-holder will be using Swarm mission data to aid in studies of the Earth's magnetic field.

New release of improved Swarm acceleration and thermosphere density data

18 September 2017

We are pleased to announce a new release of non-gravitational acceleration and thermosphere neutral density data, which was derived from the measurements of the GPS receiver.

Swarm Bravo: L1B and L2 Cat-2 data gap

14 September 2017

We inform the Swarm users that due to an anomaly that occurred on the VFM (Vector Field Magnetometer) on board Swarm Bravo, i.e., VFM generation time of science packet frozen from 11/09/2017 03:54 UTC to 13/09/2017 12:24 UTC, the Swarm Level 0 data for this time window was not generated.

Minimize Latest Mission Results News
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Fourth Swarm Science Meeting

26 July 2017

The beautiful town of Banff in Canada was the setting for one of ESA's most important scientific conferences of 2017. In March scientists convened to discuss the latest results coming from two of ESA's Earth Explorer missions: Swarm and CryoSat.

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When Swarm met Steve

21 April 2017

Thanks to social media and the power of citizen scientists chasing the northern lights, a new feature was discovered recently. Nobody knew what this strange ribbon of purple light was, so... it was called Steve.