Minimize What is CryoSat?
Web Content Image

Europe's first ice mission is an advanced radar altimeter specifically designed to monitor the most dynamic sections of Earth's cryosphere. It borrows synthetic aperture radar and interferometry techniques from standard imaging radar missions to sharpen its accuracy over rugged ice sheet margins and sea ice in polar waters. CryoSat-2 measures 'freeboard' - the difference in height between sea ice and adjacent water - as well as ice sheet altitude, tracking changes in ice thickness.

Minimize Latest Mission Operations News

CryoSat Matlab routines V1.8 now available

15 May 2015

The CryoSat Matlab routines have now been updated to V1.8 which adds the support to CryoSat Baseline C. These routines are now available for download in the Software Tools area.

CryoSat rolls in orbit again for calibration

06 May 2015

Today, 06 May 2015, CryoSat will be rolling left and right in orbit again to help continue its precise measurements of the vast ice sheets that blanket the Greenland and Antarctica areas.

CryoSat - Maintenance on the Science Server - 6 May 2015

05 May 2015

CryoSat users are informed that tomorrow, 6 May, between 09:00 and 09:30 CEST, the Science Server will undergo a planned maintenance by the service provider.

The server may be unreachable during this time window. We apologise for the inconvenience.

Minimize Latest Mission Results News
Web Content Image

CryoSat detects sudden ice loss in Southern Antarctic Peninsula

22 May 2015

A recent acceleration in ice loss in a previously stable region of Antarctica has been detected by ESA's ice mission.

Web Content Image

Remembering Marc Cornelissen and Philip de Roo

05 May 2015

Marc Cornelissen and Philip de Roo tragically went missing on 29 April 2015 whilst on expedition in the Canadian High Arctic, in a location near Bathurst Island, some 200 km north of Resolute Bay, Nunavut. It is feared that the two Dutch polar explorers fell through the ice into the water whilst traversing dangerously thin ice in a region of open sea ice.

Web Content Image

Join the virtual classroom

04 May 2015

Registration is open for a free online course that provides an introduction to monitoring climate change using satellite Earth observation.

Web Content Image

Fast access to CryoSat's Arctic ice measurements now available

17 April 2015

ESA's ice mission has become the first satellite to provide information on Arctic sea-ice thickness in near-real time to aid maritime activities in the polar region.

Web Content Image

Ice venturers yield results for CryoSat

18 March 2015

Trekking to the far reaches of the Arctic for the sole purpose of collecting snow and ice measurements may seem extreme, but it is thanks to these efforts that scientists will soon have even better satellite information at their fingertips to assess changes in polar ice.

Web Content Image

Satellites catch Austfonna shedding ice

23 January 2015

Rapid ice loss in a remote Arctic ice cap has been detected by the Sentinel-1A and CryoSat satellites.

Web Content Image

CryoSat extends its reach on the Arctic

15 December 2014

CryoSat has delivered this year's map of autumn sea-ice thickness in the Arctic, revealing a small decrease in ice volume. In a new phase for ESA's ice mission, the measurements can now also be used to help vessels navigate through the north coastal waters of Alaska, for example.

Web Content Image

CryoSat unveils secrets of the deep

03 October 2014

ESA's ice mission has been used to create a new gravity map, exposing thousands of previously unchartered 'seamounts', ridges and deep ocean structures. This vivid new picture of the least-explored part of the ocean offers fresh clues about how continents form and breakup.

Web Content Image

Ice sheet highs, lows and loss

20 August 2014

Measurements from ESA's CryoSat mission have been used to map the height of the huge ice sheets that blanket Greenland and Antarctica and show how they are changing. New results reveal combined ice volume loss at an unprecedented rate of 500 cubic kilometres a year.

Minimize Science
Web Content Image

Science

Almost 80% of the Earth's fresh water is locked up in the cryosphere, i.e. snow, ice and permafrost. The cryosphere plays an important role in moderating the global climate and as such, the consequences of receding ice cover due to global warming are far reaching and complex. Due to its high albedo, ice masses directly affect the global energy budget by reflecting about 80% of incident sunlight back out to space.