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A new satellite to understand how Earth is losing its cool

24 September 2019

Following a rigorous selection process, ESA has selected a new satellite mission to fill in a critical missing piece of the climate jigsaw. By measuring radiation emitted by Earth into space, FORUM will provide new insight into the planet's radiation budget and how it is controlled.

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Proba-V – Universal Access to Information

27 September 2019

Proba-V data is free and openly accessible through various portals. The Terrascope platform, built on the technology and expertise gained from the Mission Exploitation Platform (MEP), enables users to access, view, and analyze the Proba-V data in multiple ways and facilitates a more efficient path from data to information and new knowledge on our planet's dynamics.

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Harnessing artificial intelligence for climate science

18 September 2019

Over 700 Earth observation satellites are orbiting our planet, transmitting hundreds of terabytes of data to downlink stations every day. Processing and extracting useful information is a huge data challenge, with volumes rising quasi-exponentially.

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A year trapped in Arctic ice for climate science

24 September 2019

As millions of people around the world marched for urgent action on climate change ahead of this week's UN Climate Action Summit, an icebreaker set sail from Norway to spend a year drifting in the Arctic sea ice. This extraordinary expedition is set to make a step change in climate science – and ESA is contributing with a range of experiments.

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World Space Alliance continues to strengthen

27 September 2019

The ESA–SAP World Space Alliance continues to grow as Airbus Defence and Space, the Environmental Systems Research Institute and GeoVille join the partnership.

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‘Meeting of waters’ Brazil

27 September 2019

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the ‘meeting of waters' in Brazil – where the Rio Negro and the Solimões River meet to form the Amazon River.

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Tigris-Euphrates River System

27 September 2019 - This image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel–2 satellite in September 2019, shows the waters of the Tigris and Euphrates mix with the salty waters of the sea.

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Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor Validation Team Workshop

11 - 14 November 2019

The purpose of this workshop is to gather feedback from the S5PVT about the uncertainty characterisation of all Sentinel-5P products that have been released to the public by the time of the S5PVT Workshop.

 

The objectives of the S5PVT workshop are to:

  • provide validation teams an up-to-date overview of the Sentinel-5P mission
  • present S5PVT calibration/validation results about the Sentinel-5P core products
  • assess the usefulness of Sentinel-5P core products for dedicated applications
  • discuss possible improved uncertainty characterization of the Sentinel-5P core products
  • foster cooperation and synergies among Cal/Val teams.

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AGU Fall Meeting 2019 - Session 'The global water cycle'

9 - 13 December 2019

The AGU Fall Meeting 2019 Conference is scheduled to take place from 09 to 13 December 2019, in San Francisco, California, USA.

 

Particularly interesting for the SMOS User community, the session "The global water cycle: Coupling and Exchanges between the ocean, land, and atmosphere" highlights water cycle research that describes linkages between the ocean, atmosphere, and land hydrology.

 

Contributions are invited on all aspects of water cycle research including analyses undertaken using in situ and spaceborne observations from current (e.g., SMAP, SMOS, GRACE-FO, GPM, GCOM-W), past (e.g., Aquarius, TRMM, GRACE), and future (e.g., SWOT, CIMR) satellite missions, estimates based on numerical models, data assimilation systems, as well as climate model projections and theoretical contributions.

 

We particularly welcome studies that consider multiple realms (the ocean, atmosphere, land surface and subsurface), and provide compelling evidence for linkages between these, describing coherent water cycle variability and change.

 

We welcome global and regional assessments across these interfaces, and contributions that demonstrate what needs to be observed to ensure that long-term changes in the water cycle are accurately quantified.