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Proba-1 and its 18 years of successful operations

20 December 2019

Launched on 22 October 2001 and originally designed as a two-year mission, Proba-1 continues to provide valuable hyperspectral data to the scientific community, alongside priceless insight of long-lived missions—all while having travelled 4,329,416,712 kilometres to date.

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Proba-1 view of Guam

18 July 2018

A cloud-specked view of the US territory of Guam in the western Pacific Ocean, as seen by ESA's Proba-1 microsatellite, which is still observing Earth despite being launched 16 years ago.

Proba-1 view of the Great Pyramids

28 March 2018

A view looking north to south of Egypt's famous Giza Pyramid Complex, as seen by ESA's Proba-1 minisatellite on 6 January 2018.

Proba-1 sets new record

08 March 2018

Originally designed as a two-year mission and launched on 22 October 2001, Proba-1 is still going strong, providing very valuable hyper-spectral data.

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Proba-1 images Calanda reservoir

20 April 2017

The blue of the Calanda reservoir amid the rugged landscape of northeastern Spain, as seen by ESA's oldest - and one of its smallest - Earth-observing missions, Proba-1, midway through its 15th year of operations.

Proba-1 celebrates 15 years in orbit

10 November 2016

The Proba-1 microsatellite (smaller than a cubic metre) is the first in ESA's series of satellites aimed at flight-testing new space technologies, designed for autonomous operations.

Proba-1 was launched on 22 October 2001 and is still going strong today, more than fifteen years later.

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Proba-1 back in operation

20 February 2015

After a short period of inactivity, Proba-1 was successfully put back in Energy mode (by ESA Redu station) on Monday 09 February 2015 at 03:10 UTC and the imaging activities were restarted on Thursday 12 February 2015.

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Shadows on ice: Proba-1 images Concordia south polar base

12 December 2012

ESA's Earth-observing microsatellite Proba-1 has glimpsed one of the loneliest places on Earth - Concordia research base in the heart of Antarctica.

The International Charter: Space and Major Disasters

The Charter is an important step forward in linking the needs of disaster and relief organisations with space technology solutions to help mitigate the effects of disaster on human life, property and the environment.

Advances in Atmospheric Science and Applications

Proceedings in Advances in Atmospheric Science and Applications held in 18-22 June 2012 in Bruges, Belgium.