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Copernicus Sentinel-1 maps floods in wake of Idai

20 March 2019

As millions of people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe struggle to cope with the aftermath of what could be the southern hemisphere's worst storm, Copernicus Sentinel-1 is one of the satellite missions being used to map flooded areas to help relief efforts.

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Grande America oil spill imaged

20 March 2019

Captured on 19 March, at 17:11 GMT (18:11 CET) by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, this image shows the oil spill from the Grande America vessel. The Italian container ship, carrying 2200 tonnes of heavy fuel, caught fire and sank in the Atlantic, about 300 km off the French coast on 12 March.

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Land-cover dynamics unveiled

21 March 2019

Billions of image pixels recorded by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission have been used to generate a high-resolution map of land-cover dynamics across Earth's landmasses. This map also depicts the month of the peak of vegetation and gives new insight into land productivity.

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Bangkok's green lung

21 March 2019

Captured on 22 January 2019 by the Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite, this true-colour image shows Thailand's most populous city Bangkok, and its 'Green Lung' Bang Kachao.

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7th CryoSat Quality Working group Meeting - Final Report

20 March 2019

The 7th CryoSat Quality Working Group (QWG) meeting was held at ESA/ESRIN from 26 - 28 November 2018. The QWG#7 was structured around 7 main sessions and involved 43 participants from different operational and research institutes including both CryoSat Expert Support Laboratory, QC and Cal/Val teams, altimetry experts and multi-thematic scientists.

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Taking gravity from strength to strength

20 March 2019

Ten years ago, ESA launched one of its most innovative satellites. GOCE spent four years measuring a fundamental force of nature: gravity. This extraordinary mission not only yielded new insights into our gravity field, but led to some amazing discoveries about our planet, from deep below the surface to high up in the atmosphere and beyond. And, this remarkable mission continues to realise new science today.

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ESA and climate change

19 March 2019

Climate change is high on the global agenda. To tackle climate change, a global perspective is needed and this can be provided by satellites. Their data is key if we want to prepare ourselves for the consequences of climate change.

Students invited to ESA's Living Planet Symposium 2019 - deadline extended

20 February 2019

Students from elementary/secondary schools and high schools are welcome to attend two different events held at the MiCo Milan (Milano Congressi) from 13 to 17 May 2019 in the context of the Living Planet Symposium.

 

Teachers are invited to register with their classes before 7 April 2019.

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Cyclone Idai, Mozambique

20 March 2019 - These images captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-3 Satellites, were acquired over the Province of Sofala, central Mozambique. The imagery shows Cyclone Idai as it approaches and makes landfall in Mozambique.

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Venice lagoon, Italy

15 March 2019 - This weeks image comparison takes us over the Venice lagoon, Italy. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 images are processed in natural color (Bands 4,3,2), and in false color (Bands 8,4,3).

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Lake Chad's shrinking waters

22 March 2019

The 22 March is World Water Day, which focuses on the importance of freshwater. The Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations aim to achieve a better and more sustainable future. Goal number six focuses on ensuring the availability and sustainable management of water for all by 2030. This image takes us over Lake Chad at the southern edge of the Sahara, where water supplies are dwindling.

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EGU General Assembly 2019

7 - 12 April 2019

The European Geoscience Union (EGU) General Assembly 2019 will as usual take place in Vienna, Austria, from 07 to 12 April 2019, bringing together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting covering all disciplines of the Earth, planetary, and space sciences.

 

The EGU aims to provide a forum where scientists, especially early career researchers, can present their work and discuss their ideas with experts in all fields of geoscience. For more information, please check the General Assembly section of the website.

 

Registration is open

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Living Planet Symposium 2019

13 - 17 May 2019

ESA is pleased to invite you to participate in the 2019 Living Planet Symposium. The event, held every three years, will take place on 13–17 May 2019 at the MiCo Milano Congressi in Milan, Italy. The Symposium is organised with the support of the Italian Space Agency.


Attracting thousands of scientists and data users, ESA's Living Planet Symposia are amongst the biggest Earth observation conferences in the world.

 

The Living Planet Symposium 2019 promises to be bigger and wider ranging than ever before. The event will not only see scientists present their latest findings on Earth's environment and climate derived from satellite data, but will also focus on Earth observation's role in building a sustainable future and a resilient society.

 

Participants will also be able to explore how emerging technologies are revolutionising the use of Earth observation, creating new opportunities for public and private sector interactions, and how business and the economy can benefit from this new epoch.

 

Registration deadline: 30 April 2019

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20th GHRSST Science Team Meeting

3 - 7 June 2019

This year marks the 20th meeting of the GHRSST International Science Team (G-XX). This is a great opportunity to have a forward looking meeting focusing on innovation and challenges to develop the future perspective for GHRSST - most notably with respect to a mix of microwave and thermal infrared satellite capability.

 

The purpose of the meeting is to:

  • Bring together scientific and operational SST users and producers to review progress and achievements of SST science and applications within the GHRSST framework;
  • Look forward towards future innovation and challenges for GHRSST and the SST community over the next 20 years
  • Open the meeting to everybody but is especially relevant to SST experts and the international community actively involved in SST science and applications
  • Use plenary discussions and keynote talks to tackle specific issues as well as poster sessions and panel discussions to promote discussion.

 

G-XX will be followed immediately by the 8th CEOS SST-VC meeting. The meeting takes place at the very end of the GHRSST International Science Team meeting so that SST-VC members can collate all of the scientific and technical progress from the week and develop a coherent strategy for the year ahead, linking GHRSST and CEOS to advance the needs of SST users around the world.

 

Registration deadline: 24 May 2019

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World Soils 2019 User Consultation Meeting

2 - 3 July 2019

The World Soils 2019 User Consultation Meeting on space-based EO tools for mapping and monitoring soils will take place from 2 - 3 July 2019 at ESA ESRIN, Frascati, Italy.

 

With the advent of operational EO systems such as the European Union Copernicus Program (including the high priority Copernicus expansion missions), the free and open EO data policies as well as cloud-based access and processing capabilities (e.g. DIAS) an EO based Soil Monitoring System appears feasible today.

 

The aim of the workshop is to bring together stakeholders from the policy and user domain with remote sensing experts to discuss the necessary steps to develop such a system.

 

Abstract submission deadline: 31 May 2019

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Earth Explorer-9 User Consultation Meeting

16 - 17 July 2019

The Earth observation scientific community is invited to participate in a European Space Agency (ESA) User Consultation Meeting at the Robinson College, University of Cambridge in Cambridge, United Kingdom on 16–17 July 2019. This consultation forms a critical input to the decision-making process that will lead to the selection of ESA's ninth Earth Explorer mission.

 

Two candidate Earth Explorer fast-track missions – FORUM and SKIM – have been undergoing feasibility studies since November 2017, the conclusions of which are detailed in corresponding Reports for Mission Selection which will be published in June 2019.

 

Thanks to new technical developments, the Far-infrared Outgoing Radiation Understanding and Monitoring (FORUM) candidate would measure radiation emitted from Earth across the entire far-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Significantly, it measures in the 15–100 micron range, which has never previously been achieved from space.

 

Please note that since space is limited at the meeting, it is advised to register as soon as possible.

 

Registration deadline: 14 June 2019

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SI-Traceable Space-based Climate Observing System Workshop

9 - 11 September 2019

A CEOS WMO-GSICS workshop will be hosted by the UK Space Agency at National Physical Laboratory (NPL), London, UK from 09 to 11 September 2019.

 

Recent years have seen an increasing urgency from international coordinating bodies such as CEOS, WMO-GSICS, GCOS, climate researchers, and policy makers to establish a space-based climate observing system capable of unambiguously monitoring indicators of change in the Earth's climate, as needed for international mitigation strategies such as the 2015 Paris climate accord. Such an observing system requires the combined and coordinated efforts of the world's space agencies.

 

To deliver data that can be considered unequivocal on decadal timescales, facilitating policy makers to make decisions in a timely manner, requires improvements to heritage, existing, and in-development space assets. In particular, observations spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from the near-UV to microwave need to be of sufficient accuracy and duration, traceable to the International System of Units (SI), and sampled to ensure global representation in order to detect change in as short a timescale as possible. The harshness of launch and the space environment has to date limited any satellite mission's ability to robustly demonstrate SI traceability on-orbit at the accuracy and confidence levels needed.

 

An order of magnitude improvement is typically required for robust climate observations. Although not as demanding in terms of long-term accuracies, implementing such a system also facilitates improvements to operational applications, particularly where data harmonisation enables ‘information on-demand' for a wider range of applications such as health, a sustainable food supply, and pollution.

 

Bringing together experts from space agencies, industry, academia, and policy makers, the intent of this international workshop is a community strategy to quantify the benefits and consequential specifications of a space-based climate observing system along with a roadmap to implementation. 

 

Pre-registration for this open workshop is required for the venue.

 

Interested users can submit a 300- to 500-word abstract to events@npl.co.uk stating clearly how it addresses the scope and themes of the workshop; the following text must be added to the subject heading of the email: 'CEOS WMO-GSICS Workshop abstract submission'.

 

The extended deadline for abstract submission is 30 April 2019.