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The production of many operational sea surface temperature products emphasise its input to meteorological forecasting models. In addition it is a key element in the understanding of major events such as La Ninã.

Minimize Sea Surface Temperature
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Surfing for science

29 July 2015

Thanks to a new system developed by scientists in the UK, taking to the waves for a spot of surfing can benefit research into the health of coastal waters, and could help confirm satellite measurements of sea-surface temperature.

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SMOS on acid

17 February 2015

With fundamental changes happening to the chemistry of the world's oceans, salinity information from ESA's SMOS mission is being used with other Earth observation data to obtain information on 'the other carbon dioxide problem' - ocean acidification.

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Salinity matters

18 December 2014

Measurements of salt held in surface seawater are becoming ever-more important for us to understand ocean circulation and Earth's water cycle. ESA's SMOS mission is proving essential to the quest.

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Five years of soil moisture and beyond

03 November 2014

ESA's SMOS satellite has clocked up more than one billion kilometres orbiting Earth to improve our understanding of our planet's water cycle. Marking its fifth birthday, all the data collected over land and ocean have been drawn together to show how moisture in the soil and salinity in the ocean change over the year.

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How does a beer cooler help understand climate?

09 July 2014

While engineers have almost finished building the first Sentinel-3 satellite for ocean forecasting and marine safety, a beer cooler has an unusual role in supporting the long-term record of sea-surface temperatures.

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Monitoring climate change from space

13 June 2014

How do measurements from satellites flying above Earth provide essential information on the effects of climate change on our planet? Scientific and political organisations considered the question in London today.

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Pine Island retreat on the radar

27 March 2014

Twenty years of radar coverage from ESA satellites have been used to measure the rapid thinning of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier - and it's losing more ice than previously thought.

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Balancing the sea-level budget

26 March 2014

Water from melting glaciers and ice sheets, along with thermal expansion of ocean water due to rising temperatures, are causing global sea-level rise. Scientists are exploiting satellite data to understand better just how much each component contributes to this devastating consequence of climate change.

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Is global warming hiding underwater?

07 February 2014

Satellite observations of global sea-surface temperature show that a 30-year upward trend has slowed down within the last 15 years. Climate scientists say this is not the end of global warming, but the result of a rearrangement in the energy flow of the climate system and, in particular, how the ocean stores heat.

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Science meets Sentinel-3

06 December 2013

With the first of the Sentinel satellites being readied for launch next spring, scientists are looking ahead to the third mission in the series to ensure the highest quality data possible.