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Connecting the dots: nitrogen dioxide over Siberian pipelines

20  June 2019

New maps that use information from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite reveal emissions of nitrogen dioxide along a Siberian natural gas pipeline that connects the Urengoy gas field with Europe.

siberian pipelines

Connecting the dots: nitrogen dioxide over Siberian pipelines

20 June 2019

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New maps that use information from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite reveal emissions of nitrogen dioxide along a Siberian natural gas pipeline that connects the Urengoy gas field – the second-largest gas field in the world – with Europe.

The Urengoy–Pomary–Uzhhorod pipeline is one of Russia's main natural gas export pipelines. In order to maintain the pressure and flow over long distances, a series of compressor stations are strategically placed to help push the gas along.

Compressor stations typically run on gas-powered turbines, and their high-temperature combustion usually leads to small quantities of nitrogen dioxide emissions being lost to the atmosphere.

Until now, it has proved difficult to measure trace-gas concentrations over snow-covered regions such as Siberia, northern Europe and Canada, as it has been very difficult to distinguish clouds from snow and ice in the data retrieval algorithms – considering snow and clouds appear equally bright and cold.

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For an overview on the MIRAS instrument anomalies and their impact on the SMOS mission data availability see Experienced MIRAS Anomalies and Mission Impact.

Detailed SMOS unavailability and anomalies reports are produced by the SMOS Flight Operation (FOS) team and are available here:

For weekly reports see the respective links below:

SMOS Flight Operation Segment Weekly Reports 2019
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SMOS Flight Operation Segment Weekly Reports (Archive)
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CryoSat abstracts for Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting - deadline 21 June

20 June 2019

CryoSat experts and scientific users are encouraged to submit abstracts for the Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting (OSTST, Chicago, 21-25 October 2019).

Abstracts are also required for the splinter session "Science IV: Altimetry for Cryosphere and Hydrology".

Information for the meeting can be found at the OSTST website.

The extended abstract submission closes on Friday, 21 June.


The reports provided here are based on information pertaining to the operational and reprocessed CryoSat data products. The CryoSat Cyclic Reports are compiled to keep the CryoSat community informed of the overall mission performance and the status of the SIRAL instrument. The report is based on a 30-day reporting period, which has been defined by UCL/MSSL since the Transfer to Operations, as part of the routine QA monitoring activity.

The reports use the following naming convention: CS2_CR_XX_YYYYMMDD_yyyymmdd_VV

XX = Cycle number (where "C" denotes cycles from the Commissioning Phase)

YYYYMMDD = Start of reporting period covered by the report

yyyymmdd = End of reporting period covered by the report

VV = report version

 

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Zhanjiang, China

05 June 2019

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World Environment Day

5 June marks World Environment Day, which was established in 1972 by the United Nations to raise people's awareness of our vulnerable environment and other environmental issues.

This year's World Environment Day is hosted by China, with a theme on air pollution, a world-wide issue that is most prominent in the Asia-Pacific region. In this region, air pollution directly or indirectly causes an estimated 4 million deaths (from the 7 million people world-wide). In some major Chinese cities, the air can sometimes be so polluted that even on a ‘clear' sunny day people hardly see the sun. 

Nevertheless, the Chinese government is taking measures to improve the air quality, which is already observed over the last few years from space by dedicated air quality satellite sensors.
Below we show a Proba-V image of 17 May 2019 of Zhanjiang, a city in the south of China with ~6.5 million inhabitants, located at the South Chinese Sea.

The city can be seen as a grey area in the top-middle part of the image. At the bottom of the image the northern part of the Hainan island is visible.

LAI

© ESA-BELSPO 2019, produced by VITO
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Lena Delta, Russia

18 June 2019

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A unique Arctic landscape

Where the Lena River, one of Russia's five longest waterways, flows into the Laptev Sea, it forms a unique delta of three million hectares, 6 500 km river branches, more than 30 000 lakes of varying sizes and over 1 500 islands.

When seen from above, even in this false-colour 100 m image of Proba-V, the water mosaic is enriched by the brightness of the tundra vegetation cover, a mix of nearly 1 000 species of vascular plants, grass, moss, lichen and algae species. The small larch grove, on one of the southern islands, is considered the northern most forest massif of northeast Eurasia.

The Lena Delta and the Ust-Lensky Reserve, that occupies almost half of the delta, are key for the nesting of migrating birds, like the rare Siberian white crane, and supports mammals like the white whale, polar bears, Arctic fox and wild reindeer.

The mixture of land and water and the richness in fauna and flora, all under conditions of (up to 600 m deep) permafrost and the harsh northern climate, make the Delta a unique Arctic landscape and natural heritage to be preserved.

LAI

© ESA-BELSPO 2019, produced by VITO
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