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SMOS level 2 sea surface salinity products v662 released to users

15 May 2017

ESA would like to inform that SMOS level 2 sea surface salinity products version v662 are now available to the users.

The main changes introduced in the user product v662 are:

  • the replacement of sea surface salinity 1 field with the retrieved sea surface salinity based on an updated single roughness model and corrected for land-sea contamination effect
  • the replacement of sea surface salinity 2 field with the retrieved sea surface salinity based on an updated single roughness model
  • the replacement of sea surface salinity 3 field with the sea surface salinity anomaly (corrected for land-sea contamination) based on World Ocean Atlas climatology (WOA-2009)

Operational and reprocessed sea surface salinity v662 products since 01 June 2010 are now available from the ESA SMOS Online Dissemination service accessible here in both ESA Earth Explorer (EEF) format and NetCDF format. A catch-up reprocessing will be performed in the next weeks to fill the 3 months data gap present from 01 February to 10 May 2017.

A description of the algorithms implemented in the L2OS v662 product is provided in the Algorithm Theoretical Baseline Document (ATBD) available here.

Further information on sea surface salinity v662 product performances is provided in the read-me-first note available here, in the data reprocessing verification report available here and in the data reprocessing quality control report available here. The SMOS level 2 sea surface salinity data users should carefully consult those documents to ensure optimum exploitation of the v662 dataset.

The SMOS level 2 sea surface salinity data users are invited to use this new operational and reprocessed dataset for their long-term research and applications. The v662 dataset supersedes the previous dataset generated by the algorithm baseline v622.


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