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Recent Validation Results for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

Kaley A. Walker(1), Chris Boone(1), Randall Skelton(1), Sean D. McLeod(1), Peter F. Bernath(1), Kimberly Strong(2) and C. Thomas McElroy(3)

(1) University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada
(2) University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7, Canada
(3) Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4, Canada

Abstract

The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), also known as SCISAT-1, is a Canadian scientific satellite to perform remote sensing measurements of the Earth's atmosphere. It was launched on August 12, 2003 and has been making measurements since February 2004. The primary ACE instrument is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) operating between 750 and 4400 cm-1. It also houses two filtered imagers to measure atmospheric extinction due to clouds and aerosols at 0.525 and 1.02 microns. The secondary instrument on-board SCISAT-1 is a dual UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometer called ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) which extends the wavelength coverage to the 280-1030 nm spectral region.

The primary measurement technique for both instruments is solar occultation. Altitude profiles of atmospheric trace gas species, temperature and pressure are obtained from these measurements. The 650 km altitude, 74 degree circular orbit provides the mission with global coverage though the focus is on the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The primary goal of the ACE mission is to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region. Current validation comparisons for both instruments will be presented in this paper.

 

Workshop presentation

Full paper

Keywords: ESA European Space Agency - Agence spatiale europeenne, observation de la terre, earth observation, satellite remote sensing, teledetection, geophysique, altimetrie, radar, chimique atmospherique, geophysics, altimetry, radar, atmospheric chemistry